Little Shred Corvette

200 MPH CorvetteTexan John Hennessey has a love affair with cars; and speed, like price, is not an object. Being an epic gear head, he modified his 2014 Chevy Corvette Stingray to hit speeds of 200mph.

Um, yes please.

Last week, [John] Hennessey and the Texas state troopers were back at it — this time with a 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray bumped up to 700 hp, proving once again that the Lone Star State can properly track cars traveling 200 mph.

Hennessey’s first stab at tweaking the Stingray for more power has been fairly mild by his standards; of the 240-hp step up from the stock machine, 100 hp came from a nitrous system, with the rest provided by enlarged headers, exhausts and other deep-breathing changes.

Luckily for Hennessey, Texas authorities are not only building copious amounts of new toll roads like the stretch outside Houston shown below, but take a pro-business outlook towards letting a tuner do high-speed testing. Since the road carries no traffic yet, the state patrol was there mostly as spectators and to test their radar guns on a 200-mph target. (H/T – Robert B.)

Friggin’ Texas; ya gotta love it. There’s video at the link. If you’re a speed freak, check it out.

8 thoughts on “Little Shred Corvette

  1. Jim Scrummy

    At one time Montana did not have any speed limit on Interstate Highways. I miss those days. I wish I still had some military friends in Germany. Loved hearing their stories on navigating the Autobahn, in rain.

    Reply
  2. Robert B.

    We have a stretch of road around San Antonio with a posted limit of 85 MPH. And another between El Paso and Midland posted 80 MPH. I’ll bet that burns some liberal @$$holes in D.C.

    “Don’t Mess With Texas.”

    Reply
  3. terrapod

    Back in ’81 or ’82 I drove to LA by way of US 10 crossing TX in a 1977 Caprice wagon, nice big V8 powered beast. Being young and foolish, was driving at 1 AM or so, not being tired, when a Greyhound bus blasted past at 100MPH (I was loping along at 80 or so), given there was nothing on the road and it was laser straight, decided to keep up with the big guy, so we crossed most of TX at 100 to 110 MPH. Best cross TX drive I have ever taken and it there were any patrols around, never saw one.

    Reply
  4. realwest

    I have to admit Wyatt, there is some appeal to driving an automobile 200 m.p.h. But a long time ago (around 1968) I used to drive a little MG in gymkhanas near my college. Friend graduated with me and his RICH parents bought him a Jaguar XKE. Being young, dumb and full of his parent’s money, we drove across the country. Back in the day Nevada had no speed limits on Highways and I arranged for us to swap so I’d be behind the wheel right after we hit the Nevada State line. In no time at all I had that Jag up to 120 mph and my friend was a little green around the gills! Then I spied a spec of dust in the rear view mirror, a car was GAINING on us, so I pumped the Jag up to 140 mph (dealer said it would do at least 150 mph straight off the freighter that brought it here). Jag was completely cool -like riding on train tracks, no real vibration and she felt like she wanted to go faster, but I lacked the nerve to do that -about 15 minutes later we were passed by something weird and red, as if we were doing 40 in a 65 mph lane. Next truck stop we pulled in and I saw this weird (to me) looking dust covered red bomb – went inside and the owner said it was a Lamborghini (I hadn’t heard that name before) and he was doing “around 170 m.p.h.” when he passed us.
    That truly cured me of any desire to drive a car 200 m.p.h. – cause if you hit even a jack-rabbit or large stone, you, your car and all of your hopes and dreams would be gone justlikethat.

    But this was a cool story even if I am too cowardly to try 200 mph on a highway!! Thanks.

    Reply
  5. Rob in Katy

    That is here in Katy. 99 is a mixed blessing, more tax revenues that the school district will immediately squander on common core and more traffic…wait, not so much of a blessing :)

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>